California laws regarding dating minors

29-Jan-2017 03:25

Yet people who have not committed violent or coercive offenses may nonetheless be required to register as sex offenders and be subject to community notification and residency restrictions.

For example, in many states, people who urinate in public, teenagers who have consensual sex with each other, adults who sell sex to other adults, and kids who expose themselves as a prank are required to register as sex offenders. Brandon was a senior in high school when he met a 14-year-old girl on a church youth trip.

Registration laws should be narrowed in scope and duration.

Publicly accessible online registries should be eliminated, and community notification should be accomplished solely by law enforcement officials.

Some politicians cite recidivism rates for sex offenders that are as high as 80-90 percent.

In fact, most (three out of four) former sex offenders do not reoffend and most sex crimes are not committed by former offenders.

Blanket residency restrictions should be abolished. Proponents of sex offender registration and community notification believe they protect children in two ways: police have a list of likely suspects should a sex crime occur in the neighborhood in which a registered offender lives, and parents have information that will enable them to heighten their vigilance and to warn their children to stay away from particular people.

Advocates for residency restrictions believe they will limit offenders' access to children and their temptation or ability to commit new crimes.

The laws offer scant protection for children from the serious risk of sexual abuse that they face from family members or acquaintances.

Indeed, people children know and trust are responsible for over 90 percent of sex crimes against them.

In addition, sex offender laws are predicated on the widespread assumption that most people convicted of sex offenses will continue to commit such crimes if given the opportunity.

They reflect a deep public yearning for safety in a world that seems increasingly threatening.

Every child has the right to live free from violence and sexual abuse.

The laws offer scant protection for children from the serious risk of sexual abuse that they face from family members or acquaintances.

Indeed, people children know and trust are responsible for over 90 percent of sex crimes against them.

In addition, sex offender laws are predicated on the widespread assumption that most people convicted of sex offenses will continue to commit such crimes if given the opportunity.

They reflect a deep public yearning for safety in a world that seems increasingly threatening.

Every child has the right to live free from violence and sexual abuse.

Ashoka Mukpo, US Program Associate, and US Program interns Anjali Balasingham, Andrea Barrow, Madeline Gressel, and Kari White provided important research assistance.