Dating old beer bottles

10-May-2017 18:13

You must enter all of the attributes for the engine to function correctly and give an accurate estimate.

Only bottles from the Canada and the United States are currently supported and dating ends at 1920.

This is very frequently the case, especially with soda, mineral water, beer and other bottles of the 1880-1930 period, in which the initial(s) of the “end user” (such as the bottler, brewery, drug manufacturer, or other firm for which the bottle was made) appear embossed on the base. initials of early glass companies) may vary slightly in appearance and punctuation from one bottle to another. These marks usually served as some type of mold identification, indicating a particular mold used by a glass factory.

For instance, they sometimes occur with or without periods after each letter. If a number of identical molds were produced for making a certain type of bottle, they would often be serially numbered (such as 1 to 12).

The info presented on this site is the most accurate I’ve been able to find at present, but any comments (pro or con), clarifications or corrections (preferably backed up with , but please be aware that I’m not an appraisal service, and I may not respond to queries along the general lines of “what is this jar worth?

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But the advent of pasteurization in 1876 made it safe to bottle fermented products, and along with America’s growing rail system, the bottled-beer industry boomed.

(Please see my webpage on numbers on the bottom of bottles).

You see, THOUSANDS of bottles carry nothing but a number on the base (or heel) , and this information (in most cases) does not help ID the source or age………nearly all glass factories used mold numbers on their containers at one time or another.

This list primarily includes marks that represent the actual glass company that made the container.

Many marks are encountered that indicate the company whose product was contained within it, or are trademarks (“brand names”) that give no indication of who actually made the glass, and those are (with quite a few exceptions) , not included in my list.

But the advent of pasteurization in 1876 made it safe to bottle fermented products, and along with America’s growing rail system, the bottled-beer industry boomed.

(Please see my webpage on numbers on the bottom of bottles).

You see, THOUSANDS of bottles carry nothing but a number on the base (or heel) , and this information (in most cases) does not help ID the source or age………nearly all glass factories used mold numbers on their containers at one time or another.

This list primarily includes marks that represent the actual glass company that made the container.

Many marks are encountered that indicate the company whose product was contained within it, or are trademarks (“brand names”) that give no indication of who actually made the glass, and those are (with quite a few exceptions) , not included in my list.

he has a extensive list with alot of great material on obscure glass and pottery companies here: Manuf Beer ******************************************************************************** Usually embossed on the base, marks may also appear on the lower heel area on certain types of bottles, especially sodas.