Dating schweiz post new topic

30-Aug-2016 17:44

One-quarter (25%) of all teens have unfriended or blocked someone on social media because that person was flirting in a way that made them uncomfortable.Just as adult women are often subject to more frequent and intense harassment online, teen girls are substantially more likely than boys to experience uncomfortable flirting within social media environments.And breakups through social media (which, like texts, are also viewed as having low levels of acceptability) are also relatively common – 18% of teens with dating experience have experienced or initiated a breakup by sending a private social media message, changing their relationship status on Facebook or posting a status update.Dating isn’t always a positive experience for youth, in person or digitally.Teens also use social media to express public support or approval of others’ romantic relationships.Nearly two-thirds (63%) of teens with dating experience have posted or liked something on social media as a way to indicate their support of one of their friends’ relationships.Fully 35% of all teen girls have had to block or unfriend someone who was flirting in a way that made them uncomfortable, double the 16% of boys who have taken this step.Many teens in relationships view social media as a place where they can feel more connected with the daily events in their significant other’s life, share emotional connections, and let their significant other know they care.

But even as they use social media to show affection, display their relationships and support their friends’ relationships, many teen daters also express annoyance at the public nature of their own romantic partnerships on social media.

In this study, we asked teen daters about a number of things they might have done online or with a phone to someone they were dating or used to date.

These behaviors fall on a spectrum of seriousness, from potentially innocuous to troubling.

Some 69% of teen social media users with dating experience agree that too many people can see what’s happening in their relationship on social media; 16% of this group “strongly” agrees.

Most teens in romantic relationships assume that they and their partner will check in with each other with great regularity throughout the day.

But even as they use social media to show affection, display their relationships and support their friends’ relationships, many teen daters also express annoyance at the public nature of their own romantic partnerships on social media.In this study, we asked teen daters about a number of things they might have done online or with a phone to someone they were dating or used to date.These behaviors fall on a spectrum of seriousness, from potentially innocuous to troubling.Some 69% of teen social media users with dating experience agree that too many people can see what’s happening in their relationship on social media; 16% of this group “strongly” agrees.Most teens in romantic relationships assume that they and their partner will check in with each other with great regularity throughout the day.As noted above, teen daters say social media makes them feel like they have a place to show how much they care about their boyfriend, girlfriend or significant other.