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11-Sep-2017 17:33

A year ago, she married her childhood sweetheart, a cousin she grew up with.

After once seeing Western-style dating in Dubai, Anjad says, she believes it would expose her generally pious nation to an immeasurable amount of sin.

“My own mother wants me to go out with my fiance and get to know him before we marry.

No, I don’t think that way.” Secret online romance Asmaa’s sister, 21-year-old Anjad Mohammad, joins us at the wooden booth while Asmaa slips away to talk on her mobile phone.

Others in his generation say, even though the country’s youth may be growing more open and educated, they don’t plan to abandon traditions. Murdock/VOA) ‘Controlled by traditions’ “The older generation is controlled by traditions,” Abdullah says, the family section now locked for the evening prayer.

Saudi women and girls say social outlets outside their homes are rare, but becoming more common with the growing popularity of malls and women’s-only restaurants, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Jan. At prayer times, restaurants shutter their men-only sections, while men go out to pray.

The girls, 15-year-old Bassama, 17-year-old Selma, and their sister, 27-year Amani and her daughter, say the changes in their society, coupled by the maintenance of traditions, keeps them safe - at least from strict parents.

Their parents allow them to go out as many nights as they want, says Selma, as long as they are veiled and refrain from contact with boys.

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This limits women’s access to education, jobs, gyms and parks, Abdulrahman says, who considers segregation of the sexes “a waste of money” and “racism.” Abdulrahman, wearing a tee shirt and a bulky skull-cap, says that women, who make up half of Saudi society, are missing out on what little entertainment there is in Riyadh, hidden largely behind veils and closed doors.At an outdoor cafe in the Saudi Arabian capital, 28-year-old Abdullah looks nervous, but says he is happy to chat with two female reporters.As we sit down at one of the empty tables, the manager comes outside and asks us to leave.“She sticks to the traditions,” the younger woman says of her sister, “I like the new ways.” Even five years ago, it would be strange for two young women to wander around town like they are tonight, she says, stopping in here for a cappuccino and free wifi.But for Anjad, the good "new ways" do not include what the men down the street say is a new courting ritual among their friends.

This limits women’s access to education, jobs, gyms and parks, Abdulrahman says, who considers segregation of the sexes “a waste of money” and “racism.” Abdulrahman, wearing a tee shirt and a bulky skull-cap, says that women, who make up half of Saudi society, are missing out on what little entertainment there is in Riyadh, hidden largely behind veils and closed doors.At an outdoor cafe in the Saudi Arabian capital, 28-year-old Abdullah looks nervous, but says he is happy to chat with two female reporters.As we sit down at one of the empty tables, the manager comes outside and asks us to leave.“She sticks to the traditions,” the younger woman says of her sister, “I like the new ways.” Even five years ago, it would be strange for two young women to wander around town like they are tonight, she says, stopping in here for a cappuccino and free wifi.But for Anjad, the good "new ways" do not include what the men down the street say is a new courting ritual among their friends.But women stay inside, so we can finish our mocha coffees unnoticed. But some among the older generation fear that “freedom” for 20-somethings means vice like drugs, alcohol or premarital sex.