Magwitch is portrayed as an intimidating

09-Nov-2017 18:08

The colonial discourse that is established throughout Victorian literature formulates the concept of the alternate self or other.

Both Great Expectations and Jane Eyre contain colonial subtexts and to some extent further shape significant aspects of the cultural discourse of the British Empire.

Bertha Mason is a product of colonial ventures; she is a commodity of curiosity, the racial other as it were.

Bentley (1996:p198) argues that a Creole is “a mulatto(a), who is viewed upon with sympathy, revulsion and fascination.

Bronte uses the character of Bertha Mason, who is a Creole by birth, as a vehicle for a colonial encounter in the novel.

The figure of the Creole is utilized by Bronte solely to illustrate how colonial ventures brought the Creole into being.

Furthermore Jane Eyre and Great Expectations, both derive significantly from the imperial discourse in their stereotypical ways of representing the non-Western world.

Rochester admits to the fact that before he was rescued by Jane’s arrival he led a decadent existence after “Bertha Mason, – the true daughter of an infamous mother, – dragged me through all the hideous and degrading agonies must attend a man bound to a wife at once intemperate and unchaste.” (JE, p.348) Bertha typifies the wild, fierce, savage and erotic seductress of the colonial discourse that takes white men into her lure and corrupts and destroys them.

Her racial impurity is seen as an infection to which her insanity is attributed.

In Jane Eyre, this meeting of people and divergent cultures (as characterized by the marital union of Rochester and Bertha) is negotiated and guided by colonial and commercial interests, and does not result in an amalgamation of races and cultures.

Great Expectations is on December 27, 28, and 29 at 9pm.

“It should not be possible to read nineteenth-century British literature, without remembering that imperialism, understood as England’s social mission, was a crucial part of the cultural representation of England to the English.” (Spivak, 1985) The Victorian novel functions as an imperative examination of colonial ideologies.

Rochester admits to the fact that before he was rescued by Jane’s arrival he led a decadent existence after “Bertha Mason, – the true daughter of an infamous mother, – dragged me through all the hideous and degrading agonies must attend a man bound to a wife at once intemperate and unchaste.” (JE, p.348) Bertha typifies the wild, fierce, savage and erotic seductress of the colonial discourse that takes white men into her lure and corrupts and destroys them.

Her racial impurity is seen as an infection to which her insanity is attributed.

In Jane Eyre, this meeting of people and divergent cultures (as characterized by the marital union of Rochester and Bertha) is negotiated and guided by colonial and commercial interests, and does not result in an amalgamation of races and cultures.

Great Expectations is on December 27, 28, and 29 at 9pm.

“It should not be possible to read nineteenth-century British literature, without remembering that imperialism, understood as England’s social mission, was a crucial part of the cultural representation of England to the English.” (Spivak, 1985) The Victorian novel functions as an imperative examination of colonial ideologies.

The figure of the white female subject is typified in Jane who is positioned as the antithesis of Bertha, the racial object\ other.