Nora jones dating

25-May-2017 17:44

Because I thought I’d rather just quit music than do this all the time.

I’m a musician because I love it and it’s supposed to be fun.’ Jones, of course, did not quit music.

Having weathered the rocky start, Jones attributes her continued endurance to having 'taken control’, drawing a clear line between being a musician and being public property – or, as she puts it, 'it’s learning about how to live normally and make music normally and not get too caught up in the game.’ An essential part of this seems to be cultivating the art of not drawing attention to herself. When Jones walks into the restaurant in London where we have arranged to have lunch, nobody looks twice.

Only the fact of her personal assistant and the publicist from her record company taking up their positions at a different table to keep an eye on things looks slightly out of place.

Nobody in their right mind would have predicted it.

She was playing saxophone in the local high school marching band when her mother made the decision to send her to a performing arts high school in nearby Dallas.

'I don’t know if it was because she had ambitions for my career,’ Jones says.

'I think she wanted me to move so I wouldn’t be a pregnant cheerleader.

'When she said “Bruce Lundvall” I remember thinking, who’s that? 'And then she told me Blue Note Records, and I thought, whoah! And I’ll be damned if she didn’t call me the next day and say, “All right, I have us an appointment to meet Bruce next week.” And I’d forgotten the conversation. I was like, I got drunk last night, I turned 21.’ Jones had already recorded a demo tape, including a couple of Jesse Harris songs in a country-folk idiom and the jazz standard Spring Can Really Hang You Up the Most.

'Bruce listened to it and he said, “What do you wanna do, kid? ” I’m sitting there in Blue Note Records, and I’m like, “A jazz singer, of course.” I didn’t know what I wanted to do, but I wasn’t going to flail around in front of the big boss.’ Lundvall would later describe how bowled over he was by Jones at their first meeting.

She was playing saxophone in the local high school marching band when her mother made the decision to send her to a performing arts high school in nearby Dallas.

'I don’t know if it was because she had ambitions for my career,’ Jones says.

'I think she wanted me to move so I wouldn’t be a pregnant cheerleader.

'When she said “Bruce Lundvall” I remember thinking, who’s that? 'And then she told me Blue Note Records, and I thought, whoah! And I’ll be damned if she didn’t call me the next day and say, “All right, I have us an appointment to meet Bruce next week.” And I’d forgotten the conversation. I was like, I got drunk last night, I turned 21.’ Jones had already recorded a demo tape, including a couple of Jesse Harris songs in a country-folk idiom and the jazz standard Spring Can Really Hang You Up the Most.

'Bruce listened to it and he said, “What do you wanna do, kid? ” I’m sitting there in Blue Note Records, and I’m like, “A jazz singer, of course.” I didn’t know what I wanted to do, but I wasn’t going to flail around in front of the big boss.’ Lundvall would later describe how bowled over he was by Jones at their first meeting.

I think she just saw the high school I was in and how a lot of other girls were getting into drugs and things.