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I started heavily expressing this during high school and eventually was crowned Prom Queen at my school, catapulting me into labeling myself as transgender at that time — I now know I can be whatever I want to be! "Transgender is a big umbrella term that means lots of things to lots of people," explains Rebecca Kling, a transgender performance artist and educator.

"The way transgender is usually defined is 'having a gender identity that is different than your sex assigned at birth.'"So for many non-binary folks they may say, ' Well, the doctor said _____ when I was born, but actually I'm not a boy or a girl.

While I have a strong dissonance to being female and an attraction to being male, I don't fully desire the reproductive organs of being male.

Most people are familiar with the gender binary system, meaning there are two opposite, distinct, and fixed options: masculine/male/men and feminine/female/women.Likewise, some transgender people don't think of non-binary folks as trans. "I'm a 6-foot-tall, 127-pound person," she explains.It's obnoxiously confusing."Now, another thing to understand is that when it comes to your gender, there are two parts: your gender identity (how you perceive yourself) and your gender expression (how you present yourself to the outside world)."Gender expression can include how a person dresses, how they style their hair, their behaviors/mannerisms, and even their voice," Dr. "I can easily pass as male and prefer to pass as male and dress as male, but don't outwardly show a bro-ish or aggressive male persona.""My gender expression is unique," says Jordan, "and I don't like to classify myself as simply 'masculine' or 'feminine.' I tend to be most comfortable in masculine clothes, while some of the personality traits I'm most proud of are that I'm compassionate, thoughtful, and emotionally expressive — traits that are often linked with femininity."Andii says, "my gender expression is definitely something unique — some days I prefer to dress more masculine, and other days I love to express myself as uber-feminine.I am the same person either way, and comfortable as both! "Throughout history, in many different cultures around the world, not only have more than two genders existed, but they’ve also been recognized, accepted, and respected."Another important thing to understand is that the language hasn't always been around, and we are still developing terminology (that's why things change in the LGBTQ world so often), but the concepts aren't new at all. Native American tribes like Navajo and Mohave, Maori of New Zealand, and Indigenous people of Australia are just a few examples."While the idea of non-binary gender may be so interesting that you now have a million questions, please don't use your non-binary friends in place of Google, and please don't assume that you can ask them anything you want about their gender."It's a tough thing if you're not 100% out and open," Steph explains. Two years ago I would be terrified to have someone ask me — I didn't have the right words, I didn't know, I didn't have answers.""While I'm happy to talk to almost anyone about my gender when gender comes up in conversation, I'm uncomfortable with strangers or acquaintances asking about my gender out of context or simply because they perceive me as transgender," Jordan explains.

Most people are familiar with the gender binary system, meaning there are two opposite, distinct, and fixed options: masculine/male/men and feminine/female/women.

Likewise, some transgender people don't think of non-binary folks as trans. "I'm a 6-foot-tall, 127-pound person," she explains.

It's obnoxiously confusing."Now, another thing to understand is that when it comes to your gender, there are two parts: your gender identity (how you perceive yourself) and your gender expression (how you present yourself to the outside world)."Gender expression can include how a person dresses, how they style their hair, their behaviors/mannerisms, and even their voice," Dr. "I can easily pass as male and prefer to pass as male and dress as male, but don't outwardly show a bro-ish or aggressive male persona.""My gender expression is unique," says Jordan, "and I don't like to classify myself as simply 'masculine' or 'feminine.' I tend to be most comfortable in masculine clothes, while some of the personality traits I'm most proud of are that I'm compassionate, thoughtful, and emotionally expressive — traits that are often linked with femininity."Andii says, "my gender expression is definitely something unique — some days I prefer to dress more masculine, and other days I love to express myself as uber-feminine.

I am the same person either way, and comfortable as both! "Throughout history, in many different cultures around the world, not only have more than two genders existed, but they’ve also been recognized, accepted, and respected.

"Another important thing to understand is that the language hasn't always been around, and we are still developing terminology (that's why things change in the LGBTQ world so often), but the concepts aren't new at all. Native American tribes like Navajo and Mohave, Maori of New Zealand, and Indigenous people of Australia are just a few examples."While the idea of non-binary gender may be so interesting that you now have a million questions, please don't use your non-binary friends in place of Google, and please don't assume that you can ask them anything you want about their gender."It's a tough thing if you're not 100% out and open," Steph explains. Two years ago I would be terrified to have someone ask me — I didn't have the right words, I didn't know, I didn't have answers.""While I'm happy to talk to almost anyone about my gender when gender comes up in conversation, I'm uncomfortable with strangers or acquaintances asking about my gender out of context or simply because they perceive me as transgender," Jordan explains.

Neither man or woman resonates fully, so my identity falls outside the binary."Andii Viveros, 22, says, "I do not necessarily define my gender identity with specific labels, but it is definitely gender non-binary, as I feel I am on both male and female ends of the gender spectrum.